Winter Detox 2016 update!
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Since some people may have questions about the recent cleanse we recently offered, we thought we’d break it down into a blog for you, and include some pics!  Here was the initial info we sent out, with a summary of the program (each client received a packet of info for the detox, with specific instructions on what to do each day.  They also were given my contact info, so they could address any concerns.  I did also check on them throughout the program, just to make sure they were staying on track, and weren’t discouraged with anything): New Year Cleanse Menu Template use copy Here’s the basic kit everyone received…a packet of info, my contact info, warm and cool herbal support blends, herbal tea, hand-crafted prune juice (not that icky stuff in a metal can in the grocery store!), as well as 4 days of kichadi/kitcherie.

Full program

Here’s our cooling blend, meant to be taken in case of any heartburn.  Being the winter season, this was probably the least used option in the detox!  But should any heartburn or indigestion occur, a pinch of this in some warm water would have alleviated the discomfort.

Cooling herbal blend

And now for the heating blend, which was recommended for the winter season, as well as to keep the digestive fire going (it will slow during the cleanse, since the body is focused on cleansing, and there isn’t a great deal of food being ingested).  These little ginger slices are soaked in lemon and sea salt, and are chewed before meals, to get digestive fire (or agni) going.  

Heating herbal blend

This herbal blend is dandelion and nettles, which are two powerhouse herbs for nutrients.  A simple tea made from this every day, and you’re getting a load of vitamins and minerals you usually don’t!  

Herbal tea blend: dandelion and nettles

Kichadi (or kitcherie), in its dried form.  This is a combo of dal (split beans) and basmati rice that is both nourishing and soothing to the body.  It is often fed to infants, those with illnesses, or the elderly, to assist them in the healing process.  I actually make this for clients on a regular basis, sometimes pureeing it with vegetables, to make it completely easy for digestion.

Dried dal and basmati rice

Here’s what it looks like when it’s first soaked…

Kitcherie pre-soaked

Here we are, an hour later—this is part of the reason soaking beans and grains is so vital to our health!  The mix absorbs water, helps make the mix more digestible, and is ready to be rinsed.  As a side note, this is soaked anywhere from an hour, to overnight (I prefer the latter, to make it as digestible as possible).  The mix is then rinsed until the water runs clear, which takes about 10-15 minutes.  A good deal of bean skins will float to the top and come off during the rinse process, which is what alleviates discomfort to those not accustomed to eating beans.

Kitcherie soaked

The kitcherie is then cooked with herbs for about 30 minutes, and is ready for consumption!

Kitcherie cooked and ready for cleansing!

Testimonials from clients:
  • Jacqueline D – “This cleanse went well! You made it so easy!  This was a gentle cleanse that did not leave me feeling hungry or uncomfortable at all.  The kitcherie was very nourishing and the accompanying herbal support made me feel nourished throughout.  My skin looks brighter and I feel more energetic and refreshed.  Thank you!”
  • Janet & Debbie – “Neither of us felt hungry on this cleanse – I will tell you this is definitely the longest I have gone since I was a baby without any added sugar except of course for the two apples I ate. Even as a kid I was eating those sugary cereals and then the coffee light and sweet every morning.  Debbie is doing great too.  You have two very happy customers.  I just walked past the candy man’s desk and I always grab a handful of m&m’s or twizzlers but this time I walked right past.    No problems.  Can I ask you what is it that is in the soup that helps so much?”