The 6-foot Rule

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Reading Time: 2 minutes

 

In our current paradigm, we consider 6-feet safe. A distance where germs are mitigated, risk is lowered, and our self-preservation prevails.

Not only is this false, but it encourages a behavior a close friend and I discuss frequently… a myopic view of the world. A view where nothing happens outside of our 6-foot bubble. It’s narcissism at best. It’s culture-condemning at worst.

Not so long ago, we considered how our actions affected others. We understood the importance of making appointments, holding TO those appointments, and sticking to our agreements. Perhaps we didn’t understand the ramifications of our integrity. But that integrity made a big difference.

We now live in a culture where breaking appointments isn’t a big deal; employees leave a job because of a social media incident between themselves and a co-worker; we assume the world is fine, just because our world is fine.


This couldn’t be further from the truth.


When you break appointments, you disregard the scheduling for others after you, not just the person with whom you broke the appointment. You may be the difference between someone making rent, a bonus, or losing their job. When you leave a job over an online tiff, you’re not just breaking a contract with your job; you’re showing it’s OK to dismiss your duties when times get tough. It’s OK though, because Big Tech censors and companies fire people over decades-old statements. When you think it’s all “fine everywhere because it’s fine outside your window,” you devalue the efforts and risks others take.

It’s time we consider how our actions affect others. Yes, every action. There’s a world outside of your 6-foot bubble, and it’s not a dangerous one. It’s inclusive of you, your thoughts, your level of integrity, and your actions.

Show up. Stick around. Think of how others live in the realms outside of your bubble.

P.S. Posting liberal feelings and thoughts on social media does little to progress a movement. In my observations, it stems from feelings of guilt over the privilege we’ve had throughout our lives. It’s apparent those screaming the most for radical reform are the very people incentivized their entire lives. If this concept rubs you the wrong way, I urge you to ask how you’ve benefitted from the system prior to asking others to review their status.  

What are your thoughts?

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